The Joy of Riding

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No cars or bikes were stolen to make this post possible. Joyride is a  women’s “ride to unwind” that is organized by Cycle Oregon. Usually when I see anything from Cycle Oregon I assume it’s about the  7-day awesome ride in September that I can’t attend and I get sad and wish I had a different career outside of education, but last weekend I saw an ad on social media and I followed the trail to see that this ride was completely doable. Saturday, June 9th. I’m in. I registered and then I decided to head to Dayton, Oregon on Friday and I found a link to a go back in time. Doesn’t your Internet do that? Following another trail I saw a link for a place called Vinages Trailer Resort.

I was impatient for Friday. More than usual. I took a half-day personal leave. My husband got the car tanked up and he even cleaned the windows. We took off. Dayton is about an hour and a half away. We were on the road early enough to beat the traffic, or so we thought. I was glad to put the week behind me. I wanted a little adventure and this ride would be just what I needed.

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My bike on the back stuck in Friday traffic.

 

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How cute is this?

We pulled into the Vintages lot and I was smitten with the place instantly. Admittedly I do have a fascination with trailers. I don’t come from camper people.

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Glamping! Yes, this is glamping!
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I know more about bikes than trailers but here’s our Shasta.

I’m not sure what I expected, but I’m thrilled with our trailer. We took our dog Max and apparently the other trailer I had reserved, The Ideal, was not ideal for pet people, so we were switched to the Shasta.

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Max isn’t thrilled with the pug pillow,  but he got a goody bag with bacon treats so he’s waiting partiently for a treat. Who’s a good boy?

It was brilliant that we arrived earlier enough to settle in, order pizza and relax. The place is surprisingly quiet and serene. Even the heavy rain couldn’t dampen my excitement over this find. I was getting a tiny bit worried about the the rain stealing some joy from my Saturday ride, but what can you do? I had brought rain gear just in case.

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A walk around the resort led to some bike envy. It was a feast from the past and even the bikes fit the theme.

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All campers have a barbecue and bikes to ride around the site. There’s a general store with wine glasses, food and souvenirs.

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We had all the amenities including wifi and Netflix.

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By the time the twinkle lights came on in the resort I was thinking of skipping the bike ride and just hanging out in the camper.

But who am I kidding. We slept well. Even Max who gets up a few times at night slept until 6:30. None of us sleep in that late most days.

Joyride had various staggered times so I figured we’d get there and I’d pick up my packet. But first, coffee.

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Then we loaded up the car and took off for the winery.

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Dayton, Oregon is wine country and Joyride starts and ends at the Stoller Wine Estate. The flags! I’m excited to be participating in my first ever Cycle Oregon event.

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We’re following the car in front of us trying to see where we should park.

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Pretty amazing!

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There’s a tree that blew down in the storm last night. Yeah… a big tree.

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Guess that’s not registration.

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The start line. What I love about a women’s only event is that there was a sort of constant chorus of “This isn’t a race. This isn’t a race.” There are three routes; short, medium and long.

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Family pic.

I took off. I was thinking of the medium route which was 39 miles. Easy, peasy! I had a great pace and felt pretty good. I was riding my Trek Portland which my friends at Bike Gallery got spruced up. There were many compliments about my snazzy fenders. Most of my bikes are footloose and I don’t clip in. I seldom ride the road bike. I had a ride the week before and decided I wouldn’t take the Portland, but at the last minute I felt I should go with the road bike for a longer ride. I am not clipping in on the right side. I’m agitated by this and decide that at the next rest stop I’ll have someone help me with my cleats.

About 8.9 miles there’s a rest stop that is glorious. First off the food is amazing. Fresh fruit and chocolate covered hazelnuts and granola and live music. It’s spectacular. Women are talking and there’s a different vibe to the whole affair. It’s relaxed and mellow and “Are you here with a group of friends” or “You can join us if you want.” Also, “I love that jersey. Is that Primal? Where did you find that?” In a word it’s joyous.

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Hummus, cream cheese, Nutella and almond butter on bagels and bread. I love that then men are there serving the women.

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Lovely presentation of everything!

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Yummy!

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I left after about 20 minutes of resting. IMG_1471

Heading back to the route I was feeling amazing. What a great day! I was excited about the 30 or so miles ahead. I was thinking about the other rest stops and what culinary treats would await.

As I got on the road there were some sprinkles or rain starting. Okay, sure, some drizzle. I started out with two rain jackets and it had proven to be too much. I shed one and then put it back on as I neared the road. It’s Oregon. It’s June. It’ll pass. I rode for about 4 miles. I took the medium and long route.

Then this happened.

There was a gust of wind that nearly took me down. I saw the group ahead of me get off the busy road and hide under a tree. I wanted to ride up to the tree but I also wanted to see my next birthday, so I pulled over into a field. I grabbed my phone and got a the video because it’s not that common to see white caps without being on the ocean. I put my back to the worst of the hail and then just waited to see what would happen. Would this pass? I saw the property owner get on his tractor and come down the hill. I thought he was going to yell at me to get off his property. I thought he was coming down to close his gate. Instead he yells out at me, “You can stay here as long as you want.” I could barely hear him over the din of the pelting hail. “What did you say?” I yelled. Again, “You can stay here as long as you want.” Then he waved and rode his tractor back up to his house.

After about 15 minutes some women came by and they asked if I wanted to join them. They weren’t sure if they were going to stick with the medium route but they thought they’d go for a few more miles and decide. We were surrounded by the black clouds and I still have school for another 13 days, and I don’t want to catch a cold. I was conflicted about what to do until I saw a truck speed by and decided I should head back to the short route. I made it about four miles before another drencher hit. I found a tree along with another group of five women. After about 15 more minutes and no blue sky in sight I texted my husband that I was doing the short route and I’d be back at the winery within the hour.

It ended up being a 20 mile day, but still eventful. I was kind of kicking myself about it but after we got home there was another hail storm and more rain.

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I had a glass of Pinot and enjoyed the 20 miles.

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Until next year. Most rides are joyous and wonderful. I had a great day despite the rain and I can’t wait for Joyride 2019.

Get out there and go for a ride!

Happy riding!
Bike Goddess

 

 

Box Me In, Please!

“A small group of thoughful people could change the world. Indeed, it’s the only this that ever has.” —Margaret Mead

In January 2016, I joined a small group of thoughful people who advise, advoate and work to change our little corner of the world. We meet once a month and there are some people who are always present and others, like me, who try very hard to make each meeting but run into schedule problems on occasion. We are the Bike and Pedestrian Stakeholders Group (BPSG) and we work to make streets safe for pedestrians and bicyclists. In the early days, I sat and listened and I was completely intimidated by all the traffic-speak, acroynms and history. It was hard to keep up and I often felt inept and out of the loop. Frankly, it was humbling on many level, since in my actual line of work I perform competently and with poise. In this new arena, I found it hard to find my words. The content of the meetings continues to be daunting and yet I keep going because it’s interesting and I think what we’re doing is important to the safety of our citizens.

Often times a citizen like me gets involved because they had a particular issue they want addressed. My issue was bikes more than pedestrians, and yet, through time I could see that if a project was good for peds it was usually something you could also expand to bikes. My first two concerns were bike parking in the downtown blocks and the other was an intersection near my neighborhood. The intersection had a history of challenges. At each meeting I would hear that it was being researched for bike box. A bike box is a designated area at the head of a traffic lane at a signalized intersection that provides bicyclists with a safe and visible way to get ahead of queuing traffic during the red signal phase. Bike boxes have positive benefits on both safety and traffic. Read more here.

There hasn’t been a meeting I attended that I haven’t asked about the status of a bike box in that tricky intersection. It was supposed to happen over the summer, then fall. A few weeks ago, my wish was granted. I saw that the road was closed for construction and I could feel myself getting fussy and frothy. I took a detour onto the sidewalk. Then in my periphery vision I saw this puddle of green paint and the work crew waxing on the color. Could it be? It is really? My bike box!  As I approached my left turn I saw a kid and his mom on bikes about to cross the street. I exclaimed something about the bike box and when they didn’t understand I said, “Follow me and I’ll show you.” They followed as I crossed the berm to talk with the workers.

Proudly I exclaimed that I was on the committe that requested this bike box.

The worker knew about the group and gave me a thumbs up. As I got into the traffic lane he said, “Miss, you’re in LIVE traffic.” But the other one told him to hold off the traffic so I could get my pic. All in all, it was a perfect moment.

I use it every day. Drivers are staying out of the bike box. In fact that was one of the constant issues on that street; drivers pulling up beyond the curb line to see traffic. For the first time in three years I feel safe, protected in my green bike box. I was part of making that happen. You could say I helped stop traffic. This victory gives me momentum that will carry me through the next issue, bike parking.

Be safe.

Get out there and ride!

BG

Sights on a New Year

IMG_8098I can see clearly now, the rain is gone,
I can see all obstacles in my way
Gone are the dark clouds that had me blind
It’s gonna be a bright (bright), bright (bright)
Sun-Shiny day.

Sing it Johnny Nash (not Cash), but songwriters Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff had a way with words. The fact of the matter is that I picked up my new glasses and I can see clearly now both far away and near, off to the left and the right, and thanks to this nifty prism in the lens my eyes are not wandering around making me see two cars when really there’s only one. I can really see! Zippity do da!

The moment when the glasses were slipped into place and I could read a sign across the street was magical. I’m as picky about my the frames on my face as I am about the ones I ride, thus it has taken me about a year to get my prescription filled. What a great way to start the new year! New eyes, new vision, better focus, setting my sights on a whole perspective.

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I’m the one in the blue frames. That’s my mom on the right and I have no idea who’s behind us. 

I had a great year for riding. My goal was 3,500 miles. As the sun sets on the penultimate day of the year I have 4,585 miles and 411 activities. I feel good about that. I’ll set a goal of 4,000 miles for 2018 and 415 activities. I blogged once and sometimes twice a month making this the best year ever on the blog. Go team! If I can increase that by one or two more posts during the course of the year, I will count that as a success. You’ve been a factor in motivating me to write more.  Thank you for following this blog and commenting or just clicking that star. It makes my week!

December 30th is always an excellent day for shopping. After I picked up my new glasses I did a little shopping and at one of my favorite stores the salespeople were asking about plans for New Year’s Eve. I live in the Pacific Northwest and one customer said that her family celebrates “East Coast” time and they’re in bed at 9:30 p.m.. Another said that she has two kids and they play Battleship, eat popcorn and are tucked in by 9 as well. That’s about my speed too. I’m Greek and one tradition I’ve maintained in our family is making a the New Year’s bread. You bake a coin in the dough and toast it up on New Year’s Day for breakfast (whomever gets the coin has a prosperous year.) Once that’s done I’ll have a bike ride and my husband, dog and I will have a quiet evening eating grilled cheese sandwiches, soup and salad, followed by some Champagne cupcakes and Prosecco.

When actors or writers are asked what role or book they like the most they often say, “The one I’m currently working on.” I am grateful for every day I’m healthy and able bodied enough to ride. Every route is a learning experience and every time I ride even the commuting route I see it differently because of the light, time of day, weather—my glasses! I like almost all the rides I take. There’s a few this year that I think about on those really snotty days. Santorini and Athens. I thank the universe for my trip to Greece, summer 2017. It provided some of my best biking memories of 2017. I have been drafting that post for a few months and I resolve to share it soon.

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Nisos Thira, Agios Georgios, Greece @SantoriniAdventures

I can see clearly now and I have my sights on more biking and adventures in 2018. Let’s do this! Happy New Year!

Cheers!

Bike Goddess

 

 

 

 

Getting in Gear

Last year I joined Strava. I like tracking my rides because the data is illuminating. I had been using MapMyRide, but it seemed like most of my friends were on Strava and they loved it. Peer pressure took over. All the cool kids were using Strava and I wanted to be one of them. I tried the free account for a few months and then went Premium at the tail end of 2014.

Why bother? Two reasons: motivation and data. In 2015, I started the year with ride #1 and ended with ride #303. The data says I completed more than 303 rides, but that’s what I named them. There were rides that were not numbered, but that’s fine. You can choose your own system. I decided to start 2016 the same way; ride #1 was today.

Also, when you see how many miles you ride every week, month and year, you see your progress as a rider. Essentially, you compete against yourself. Either app (and I’m sure there are others) provide features that keep you riding. You can determine your weekly mileage goals or annual totals. Plus there’s a community of riders out there who have your back. I love it when another rider gives me kudos on a ride.  Also, I enjoy seeing their routes. I wish I knew more about all its intricacies and I’d love to have a manual to explore some of the features, but most of what I’ve learned in the last year has been by experimenting or looking up stuff online. For example, the graphic above is an annual summary provided by another app or extension I found here, and it uses the Strava data.

My goals for 2016 are to keep riding and recording my rides. I’m not sure about my total mileage yet. I’m setting the bar for 4000 miles. My Kona Roundabout gets the most use use since it’s my commuter bike. I have Luna, a Cannonade Synapse road bike which is a fair weather bike. No fenders, just speed. There’s the Trek Portland and it was my commuter up until 2012. I don’t ride the Trek much and I’m considering selling, but it’s a good backup bike.

I love bikes and I love riding. Your gear can be your kit, clothing, shoes, your bike, bags and tools but one tool in particular that allows you to quantify your riding. I use Strava for everything, even walking my dog Max. It’s a new year and it might be time to explore a tool to help you track your rides.

Strava is not paying me to sell you on the idea although this post does sound like a pitch. I was dubious about making the move from MapMyRide to Strava and now I can’t imagine a simple ride without Strava. When I travel I try to rent a bike or use a city’s bike share and tracking my rides is becoming a sort of keepsake for me. It’s a great way to share your
adventures and remember your routes.

Thanks for reading. Have a great day and get out there and ride!